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Interior Design trends for 2022

Discover the top trends to look out for in 2022      

Jon Sharpe By Jon SharpeChief Creative Officer

So often trends are a marker for a moment in history, emblematic of what’s going on in the social climate and what’s important to us as a culture. Or, if you prefer to take a lighter approach, they simply reflect our ever-evolving tastes and how to implement these current twists on the timeless classics.

Often, trends tend to arrive in opposing pairs, balancing each other out and representing the spectrum of tastemakers that we admire; the neutral with the bright and the sophisticated with the playful.

This year it’s no different. The design world is set to see styles that represent how we’re ready to feel bigger and bolder than before, ready to take up space and make a playful statement with colourful glass, volume and bright shades.

At the same time, nature’s influence is undeniably present. Don’t be surprised when you see a lack of harsh lines and polished-to-perfection surfaces—they’ve been replaced with organic forms and textures in natural tones (just look to Kelly Hoppen’s monochrome home accessories collection for asymmetric silhouettes and glassy mercury-like finishes).

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LuxDeco 100 | Alix Lawson | The Luxurist

Image Credit: Alix Lawson

Puffy Chairs (and Sofas and Benches and…)

The latest interiors update: furniture is now alluringly voluminous. Opt for curved sofas and chunky armchairs because their soft, balloon-like forms are not going anywhere. Also known as neotenic design, this bold-but-liveable trend makes for an irresistible addition to any modern scheme. You can maximise the trend with oversized ceramic lamps, vases in delightfully voluptuous shapes and Barbara Hepworthesque sculptures.

Colourful Glass

Murano glass has become increasingly popular this past year, so it comes as no surprise that interior designers are wanting to delve into the art form themselves. And, whilst clear and smoky grey glass has been the favoured choice in recent years, colourful glass is finally having its moment. Create a mesmerising focal point with a dynamic light fixture (we love Jonathan Adler's) or dip your toe in with a colourful vase as delightful as the flowers it holds.

Freeform coffee tables

A simple way to update your space, changing your coffee table can elevate the entire feel of your living room. Right now, all eyes are on the freeform variety, loved for their contemporary feel and their ability to instantly increase the natural flow of a room. Available in a range of textures and sizes, freeform coffee tables channel a modern Parisian aesthetic.

80s Neutrals

80s style has made a definitive comeback. And when it comes to interior, its resurgence has arrived in the form of warm neutrals and, again, neotenic design which channels soft structures and form-conscious silhouettes. The look is best achieved with a statement chair or sofa for a look that feels remarkably modern and fun yet comfortable. Opt for pieces in a cream or tan shade to truly embrace the look.

2022 interior trends purple | LuxDeco.com Style Guide

Image Credit: Greg Natale

Purple Decor

Unquestionably a reaction to Pantones’s Colour of the Year 2022 being Very Peri, a blue-toned purple, we will be seeing plenty of the joyful shade this year. The perfect shade for those feeling adventurous, try starting with a few playful accessories—maybe a purple candle or vase—before diving in with a statement lilac armchair. This is a trend that is sure to induce creativity and delight into any home that tries it.

Curved Furniture 

The world of interiors has had a recent love affair with scalloped edges. This year, that love of a soft edge has translated into a simpler curve. It’s an elegant way of creating instant ease and a sense of femininity into a space. Think curved sofas (Eichholtz and Liang & Eimil are go-tos for those), organically formed tables, artwork with soft lines and lighting like the new additions to Heathfield & Co.’s collection. This is a firm departure from the crisp masculine furniture we’ve seen in the past.

LuxDeco 100 | Fleur Delesalle | The Luxurist

Image Credit: Fleur Delesalle

Raffia Accents

A continuation of the delight that was the 70s trend we saw in 2021, and an example of how to implement the texture trend, raffia, much like caned furniture and rattan accessories, is not going anywhere fast. Use as an accent to emphasise natural tones. Consider smaller pieces, like a lampshade, accent rug or bathroom accessories as a way to bring the natural appeal of the outside in whilst providing an artistic feel.

Texture Is Everything

Elevate your space with organic materials or pieces with a hand-crafted feel to implement the popular texture trend that will definitely be sticking around. The good news is you can nail other design trends even more by adding texture. Fun forms from the 80s look work best when covered in tactile upholstery and voluminous accessories are optimised with a rough clay finish.

Cecilia Halling, Creative Director at Elicyon, reveals her personal favourite. “Burnt and charred wood has a lovely texture—it’s a material that’s almost been destroyed and yet through the process of destruction so much character is added," the designer adds, "It’s about celebrating imperfections and highlighting the raw materiality in the right environment gives a space depth.” After all, if your pieces are handmade, surely it’s best to show it, right?

Rustic Finishes

A look that channels understated elegance, the new modern take on rustic interiors has been emerging with the designs of social media sweethearts Studio McGee and Amber Interiors big on the look. Plus, that glimpse of Meghan, Duchess of Sussex’s California home office didn’t hurt matters. Whitewashed wood and cross-beams offer a laid back feel that balances softness with sophistication. Realise the trend through dining and coffee tables, add textural accessories and soft focus lighting for a layered look.

Header image credit: LuxDeco