Anyone who follows the London luxury development market will be aware of Ten Trinity Square – the Reignwood development set in the capital’s former Port of London Authority building which neighbours the iconic Tower of London. Its reputation has deservedly grown quickly so a tour of the first show apartment (the first of 42 serviced apartments which will be situated on the third to seventh floors) was naturally a mustn’t-miss event.

Last month, we were offered a tour of the project by its interior designer Martin Kemp who highlighted the key elements of the space and released some secrets about his design.

Through a beautifully moulded door, a monochromatic entrance hallway (nodding to the building’s Art Deco age) welcomes visitors. “The apartment is one of only four residences that is solely accessed through the grand main entrance of the building and is serviced by an exclusive residential lift,” the apartment’s literature explains.

Italian marble and granite flooring grounds a hand-stitched leather and bronze-tinted mirror panel feature wall. A glossy cross-base black walnut and amber gold metal console table sits just in front, topped by an blacker-than-black vase with an organic form. The Murano glass spheres of the two vintage chandeliers – like orbiting planets – are echoed in the bronze Charles Hadcock sculpture, Working Model of Folium, 2011, which sits at the foot of the stairs.

Moving into what will undoubtedly become the entertainment hub of the apartment, the dining-cum-reception room is a calming, neutral space which you’d be hard-pressed to find anyone who it wouldn’t appeal to.

“The function of the room is living and dining. It’s more of a formal-stroke-casual apartment,” Martin explains as he picks up on individual pieces in the space, meticulously denoting them as vintage or custom.

The first statement piece – a marble and ebony topped dining table – is surrounded by bespoke velvet and dark walnut veneer chairs. Their curved form is enhanced with a decorative splat-back which extends to form the delicate back cross-leg. A vintage twentieth century Murano glass chandelier suspends above the arrangement quickly securing the room’s subtle glamour.

Although concealing a wall-mounted television, the feature wall of bespoke metal resin panels is anything but banal – it showcases a matte metallic finish and a skimmed texture which is decorated with falling relief leaves. It is flanked by built-in leather and American walnut cupboards with antique mirror and glass shelves, each filled with unique objet.

“Of course, the money shot is the view,” Martin says as we walk from the dining area. Through the informal seating area, complete with custom-made silk rug, a liquid resin-topped coffee table, book-matched American walnut chairs and vintage table lamps, the Tower of London’s turrets can be seen through paned windows, “That’s pretty spectacular at night.” Even in the daytime it doesn’t take much imagination to believe him.

“Most of the art is on loan,” Martin mentions, “because that’s the only thing that people tend to collect. But even that occasionally fits for a specific buyer.” As one rounds the room and returns to the dining area, an extra-long credenza displays some of the room’s most prestigious pieces including a sculpture by Spanish Surrealist Joan Miro. Of his go-to markets for vintage finds, Martin reveals, “Paris. The Paris market Porte de Clignancourt is one of the best in Europe, otherwise it’s New York. But the place to go really is LA.”

When asked about the inspirations behind the design Martin says, “Classical with a twist” before admitting, “That’s a bit of a cliché but it works. And it’s a classical building. We didn’t want [people] to suddenly walk into a bachelor pad.” A lack of ego on Martin’s part to try something completely unconventional (and of course completely inappropriate) as well as a keen sense of the building’s integrity led to a design which does just work so well as he said.

A light grey oak kitchen with polished titanium satinet granite worktops and herringbone timber flooring is off to the right of the entrance hallway, as is a en-suite guest bedroom. Both look out through large north-west facing windows onto the top of the soon-to-be-planted rotunda – the Ten Trinity Square’s central hub which will accommodate one of the development’s restaurants.

The staircase to the rear of the hallway continues with Italian marble and granite flooring and adds a walnut handrail with bronze effect metal spindles. The upper floor (the apartment is one of only three duplexes throughout the entire development) houses the en-suite master and second guest bedroom.

The master is an appropriately more refined space with a notable amount of blonde woods coming into play, mirroring the champagne-hued Brian Yates wallpaper. A bespoke panelled satin and leather headboard by Helen Amy Murray is the focal feature. Its ray-like folds again a nod to the Art Deco period and to the hallway’s leather work. By its side are two Betulla veneer bedside cabinets, a Helen Green Jade side table sits in the corner and a custom, curved front vanity table finished with vintage-like Anthropologie knobs (“that’s how we like to shop – we just find the nicest things”) completes the suite.

A quick visit to the private terrace via a spiral staircase seals the deal. Offering an unbroken view of the Tower and Tower Bridge, there’s nothing but open space between you and 1000 plus years of history. It really is spectacularly set. The whole experience – iconic building, incredibly sensitive restoration, timeless interior design, winning views – is, of course, impressive in every respect. Add to that list a full concierge service by the Four Seasons which is simply the proverbial icing on the already delectable cake and Ten Trinity Square takes it (the cake, that is) for London’s most sought-after address.

Prices for Ten Trinity Square, The Residences at Four Seasons start at £5 million. For enquiries, call +44 (0)20 3297 9300. Ten Trinity Square apartments are scheduled for completion by Spring 2017.

Discover the history behind Ten Trinity Square here.